Art/Construction/Costume References -currently under minor construction-
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College students can now get microsoft office for free

melthemuslim:

Just go here and sign up with your college email. You can install it on up to 5 PCs or Macs and on other mobile devices, including Windows tablets and iPads.

giancarlovolpe:

A study in creating great characters, by Aaron Ehasz (head writer of Avatar the Last Airbender). A lot of animation lead characters are forced to fit the far right criteria, but think of the many classic characters that are better described by the left: Tony Soprano, Frank Underwood, Jamie Lannister, Walter White, etc.

speci-men:

Specimen 14k: Athletic Builds (Senior Bowl Weigh In, 2014; 3 of 4)

useful tools

bossies:

amazing custom water/light reference tool
http://www.madebyevan.com/webgl-water/

image

online perspective manager/maker
http://www33.atwiki.jp/kndy/pages/94.html

online photoshop
http://pixlr.com/editor/

mrjakeparker:

Inktober is a week away and I’ve been getting lots of questions about what tools I use and recommend for inking. So I made a list of the essentials.

Go to www.mrjakeparker.com/inktober for Inktober rules and resources. #inktober

  1. Pigma Micron
    The best pen to start inking with. They have a tough felt tip that draws a firm mark and are great for understanding the basics of laying a line down.
  2. Uni Pin Pen
    An alternative to the Pigma. Tips feel a little looser.
  3. Pigma Brush Pen
    A good intro to drawing with a looser line. Tip is felt and can fray over the course of several drawings. Is recommended for larger drawings. Hard to get detailed with it.
  4. Kuretake Fudegokochi Brush Pen - Regular
    This is a molded felt tip which means it’s sturdy like the Pigmas but you get a more expressive line like the brush pens. Ink is nice and dark.
  5. Pentel XFL2L Scientific Brush - Medium Size
    This pen is a great introduction to drawing with a brush tip. It’s tip is composed of nylon fibers and are filled with aqueous dye-based inks and dry extremely dark. You can get the finest of lines and the thickest of strokes with this. Pentel also has these in two other sizes I believe. Plus it has ink refills.
  6. Pentel Pocket Brush Pen
    My work horse. Also a nylon brush tip, it offers a smooth and powerful line and can also give you fun expressive lines too. I’ve been drawing with this pen for years and it holds up to a beating, yet will still give you a fine delicate line if you need it. I highly reccommend it.
  7. Kuretake No. 13 Fountain Brush Pen
    I just got this pen and it’s beautiful. The lines are rich yet sharp. It’s great for details and broad strokes. The pen has a little more weight to it so you feel like you’re actually holding something. The fine nylon bristles have a satisfying snap to it allowing you to intuitively move from thick to thin. I love it.
  8. Winsor & Newton Series 7 Kolinsky Sable Water Colour Brush size 1This is what brush pens wish they were. This is the gold standard, Rolls Royce of inking tools. It’s the brush Bill Watterson drew Calvin and Hobbes with. No nylon, synthetics, or plastic here, just wood, metal, and hair. There’s nothing quite like drawing with one. The ONLY draw back is you have to dip is in ink, which can get tedious, especially while under a deadline.

oolongearlgrey:

tabletorgy:

hm. ʘ‿ʘ

tips against envy for other artists?

  • you are your own artist
  • nobody can do the shit that you do
  • you have no competition. art isn’t a competition
  • don’t compare yourself to anyone else.
  • don’t strive to be better than anyone else.
  • strive to be better than YOU are now 

littleulvar:

when it comes to specific poses I try to first draw the most basic shapes and movement lines and then gradually go into more and more details, like so:

image

image

if you have difficulties with perspective, try drawing a perspective grid first:

image

it’s nothing different than tips from other artists, but I hope it helped a little ;u;

samurottedge:

Since it was Munday, I decided to do a small art reference project for myself. And then I decided to make it public with the following notes.

From Left to Right, Top to Bottom:

What NOT to do (front):

  • Don’t chicken wing your arms! Although it might be easier to hold the rifle, you will make yourself a bigger target.
  • Don’t close your one eye! You will lose your depth perception, which is crucial when you are on the move, or are trying to determine how far away your target is
  • Don’t keep your legs haphazardly strewn about. You need to make sure you’re balanced!

What to do (front)

  • Keep both eyes open
  • Bend your elbows downwards and towards the ground to make yourself a smaller target
  • Bend your knees to control the gun’s recoil + be ready to move.

What NOT to do (side)

  • Don’t put the stock above your shoulder
  • Don’t lean back.
  • Both of the above reduce your control over the weapon and may result in a black eye, and the rifle flying backwards and out of your hands.

What to do (side)

  • Bury the stock of the rifle into the meaty part of your shoulder
  • Lean into the gun to keep the gun under control when the recoil of the gun kicks the gun upwards or to the side
  • Bend your knees slightly to lean forward, as well as make yourself a smaller target

Patrol/Relaxed Stance

  • The soldier is relaxed and is most likely moving around.
  • His eyes are searching for possible threats
  • His hands are still on the rifle, even if he has a sling on

Low Ready Stance

  • Possible threat has been detected
  • Entire body shifts towards threat direction
  • Stock is shouldered 
  • Eyes are focused on the possible target
  • Gun barrel is pointed in the target’s general direction, but not directly at the target.

Firing Stance

  • Immediate response
  • Soldier fires off shots while screaming to the other people in his team
  • "CONTACT!" or "THREAT!"
Anonymous asked: do you mind explaining your animation technique, like how you do it on paper and stuff? i love your little animations and i wonder how you did them!

creepkin:

thank you!!! o: but honestly i don’t have much of a technique yet, that’s why i’m in intro to 2d heh.. i have no experience at all, i am very much a student.

obv you need a light table of some kind to do traditional 2d. i can’t shell out the $$$ to buy a real one one myself so i go into the studio, which is something that’s rly only available to you if you’re a student.. but you can do a makeshift one with a lamp and any transparent surface, like if you have a glass drafting table or a clear plastic bin with a flat bottom

umm lets see tips i guess

  • do keyframes, then in-betweens. it helps you plan and pace an action. sometimes you won’t want to do this if you’re looking to make something more spontaneous like a morph animation
  • 12 frames per second is what we’re doing in class and it’s very helpful to keep that & the basic arithmetic in mind while doing my animations so i know how many frames to make a certain action to get it at the speed i want
  • slow movements take more frames closer together, fast movements take fewer frames farther apart (for example, if you’re animating a ball bounce, the top and bottom of the arc might have four or five frames each, where the middle of the arc would have two or three frames)
  • stretch & squash to exaggerate motion (in that same ball bounce, make the ball stretch as it leaps off the ground and arcs back towards the ground, then squash when it hits it)
  • understand that animation takes a long time, there’s no quick and easy cheat to making a good product. idk what else to offer you tbh. this vid is very helpful